Portfolio reviews- my 2024 online portfolio review schedule

It’s that time of year again when portfolio review events provide photographers a chance to get feedback on their portfolios, make updates to their content, and most importantly make valuable business connections with industry professionals who review their work.

In late February, yours truly will once again be joining the review team for the Palm Springs Photo Fest. The Review event takes place online Feb. 26th-Feb. 28th, 2024. The schedule is still open to sign up for reviews (via Zoom; can’t wait to return to PSPF in person again!!) There are close to 50 industry professionals who can give you honest feedback on your portfolio. The latest PSPF schedule is HERE

In mid-March, I will be doing online reviews for two chapters of the APA. On March 19th I will be doing reviews for the APA DC chapter. Details of their event will be posted on their website soon.

The following afternoon, on March 20th, I will be doing reviews via Zoom for the APA Midwest chapter. Their event is Art Rep and Consultants-focused. Per their registration page info: “Reviews are an excellent opportunity to network with well-connected agents and consultants to help you take the next steps toward commercial fame.” It’s a great opportunity to connect.

If you need some tips on how to best prepare for your review, check out my tips HERE

.

Really old news: Perfectionism and procrastination abounds

Perfectionism and procrastination have been around for a very lonnng time. As far as I can tell, for at least couple of thousand years

“Well begun is half done.” -Aristotle 384 B.C.-322 B.C.

That is my mantra for today. Something WILL get done today! Read more

Lots of Portfolio Reviews!!

Next week, I will be part of the portfolio review teams of both The Palm Springs Photo Festival and the ASMP MSP Portfolio Reviews event. The PSPF reviews are Sept. 27-29 and the ASMP review day is Oct. 1st, 2021. Both events are being held virtually via Zoom.

You can register for any of the remaining review slots via accessing the above event links.

Note: for the PSPF reviews you need to sign up for 6 reviews. There are still reviewers available in all categories– but they’re going fast.

The ASMP’s event has a limit of three reviews/person and their registration is open until Sept. 27, 2021.

I always look forward to seeing some great work. I also love providing photographers with feedback that moves them forward in their careers, and, hopefully, sparking connections for them to my network of colleagues in either the commercial or fine art photography worlds.

See you next week?

Portfolio Reviews get a pandemic pivot

There are two major portfolio review events happening this September.

ASMP Reviews and the PSPF Portfolio Reviews.

Both review events are great opportunities for photographers to connect face-to-face with those in the photo business that can help move your photography career forward.

Register for one or both events ASAP as slots are limited.

Both events are now going to happen virtually via ZOOM. (What isn’t happening via ZOOM these days?!?!?)

ASMP’s Portfolio Review event happens first on Sept. 3rd, 2020. Their registration deadline is Aug. 31. Registration link is HERE

The schedule of who is doing reviews at what time is on that link. Happy to report that I’m on the review team of both events.

The second event is the Palm Springs Photo Festival Portfolio Review (PSPF). Normally, the PSPF review events are held twice per year (in early May in Palm Springs, CA and again in mid-October in conjunction with PhotoPlusExpo).

This year PSPF’s reviews will also be happening virtually via ZOOM. Info on the PSPF Sept. 21-24 reviews is HERE

If you want to see when I’m reviewing at PSPF and the rest of the reviewers’ schedules go HERE.

You only get one chance to make a great first impression. Want some tips on how to make the most of your 20-minutes with a reviewer? I’ve got some tips HERE

Looking forward to meeting lots of new photographers and seeing some great work. And I’m really looking forward to the day–hopefully in the Spring in 2021–when we can all meet again in person and not just virtually!

 

Join me online on July 1. I’ll be the featured guest on ASMP’s Wednesday webinar.

I’ll be interviewed by ASMP’s Executive Director, Tom Kennedy. We’ll be discussing two of my favorite subjects: Marketing and Mindfulness. These two business tools have never been more important for photographers to understand and implement if they want to survive and thrive in today’s radically-changed economy.

Click on this image for more info and to register on the event page.

You’ve got to know what it cost to run your photo business.

You’ve got to know what it cost to run your photo business if you want to be around more than a year or two. The economic reality of running any small business must be faced. You have to have a pricing structure based on what all of your business costs are– or sooner or later, you will be the one who puts yourself out of business. Not your “cheap clients.”

Photographers often are told their bids for a shoot are too high and they lose a bid to someone “cheaper.” You didn’t lose the bid because of your estimate. Your real failure was a failure of eduction. It’s likely that you failed to educate both yourself–and subsequently your clients– about what it really costs a pro photographer to keep the doors open. Yes, it hurts to be underbid. But that doesn’t have to happen as often. When you have built a relationship with your client and they have some sense of why you’re charging what you’re charging they’re not as likely to automatically go with the lowest bid.  In this case, ignorance is never bliss.

I read a great article today on PetaPixel. It’s one that I recommend to all emerging photographers (and some old pros as well!).  It was penned by photographer, Tom Meyer, who lives in Decatur, GA. It was originally published on his own blog. It’s worth reading.

Here’s an excerpt.

 There are hundreds of students graduating every day as “photographers” who can under bid me for a year… maybe two. But eventually these realities also become unavoidable to them, at which time they become real estate agents or go back to being baristas… or they start billing at that “job killer” rate of $100 per hour.

More inspiration from TED talks. This time not words, but an image

I love the TED talks. I listen and am inspired. But today it was a visual from the TED that  inspired me.

When I discovered this info graphic on a friend’s Facebook wall today, I thought that photographers might also find some inspiration by seeing this TED  info graphic.

Imagine where and how your work is connected both in the ‘real’ world and the ‘virtual’ worlds.

Does it help you to see how things can connect and create synergy when it comes to creating your own photo marketing road map?

http://tedconfblog.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/ted-universe-bigger.jpg

Are you faking it? You’re in good company.

If you want to read an honest account of what torments many creative people, read this great post I saw on PixelatedImage yesterday. The author talks about the common fear shared by many creative people, that “one day everyone will all wake up to the collective revelation that I’m just faking it.”

In my long career as a photo rep, I had the privilege of seeing the whole creative kit and kaboodle of many of advertising photography’s “star photographers.”  I can tell you for a stone cold, hard fact, the “big name photographers” were also secretly worried they were “faking it” as they knew they were as capable as anyone else of producing a boatload of crappy and off-target shots.

But the other thing they had–-which not every photographer has–- is a persistence and a willingness to take creative risks, over and over and over again, until their muse blessed them again. And when the muse did return, they produced wonderful images. Those were the images went into their portfolios. I got to trumpet them as creative geniuses because I knew it was true;  they had what it takes to keep going through the valley of their doubts.

Because I repped so many photographers, I was fortunate to have a broader perspective on the creative process than a single photographer usually has. I saw all of my artists go through it. I knew that the photographic dross was just part of the process to get to “the good stuff.” When you’re all on your own, it’s harder; you sometimes think it’s just you that’s faking. It’s not!

Talking a ‘star’ photographer “off the ledge” when they hit a long creative dry spell, came with the territory. 🙂

So keep going. And going. Humbly. And with gratitude and hope. IMHO:It’s the only way.

The value of taking a break: you’ll get the creative bolts that fuel your best photography

With Independence Day falling on a Wednesday this year, it creates a dilemma for those of us who don’t have someone else telling us what days we get to take off from work. Should I only take off  Wednesday the 4th of July? Tuesday and Wednesday? Wednesday and Thursday? Or just take the whole week as few clients will likely be making project decisions this week due to the confusion.

That leaves many creative people debating on how much time they should “goof off” surrounding such a holiday–especially when their photo marketing consultant has been urging them to create some new work for their portfolio or do some meta-tagging of their images. 😉

They start to feel ambivalent and guilty because, as freelancers, they feel that if they’d just managed their time better, they could have already completed those important but non-urgent business tasks on other days and be free to play. But, alas, they didn’t get those non-urgent tasks done. Yet again. (I totally empathize!!)

So they now face a holiday with twinges of guilt. “Should I just bagged it all and go on that long bike ride, to that baseball game, picnic, concert, parade, etc. or should I stay in and work on that stuff?”

I don’t know about you but I loved reading this article in the NY Times about the value of down time.

“The space and quiet that idleness provides is a necessary condition for standing back from life and seeing it whole, for making unexpected connections and waiting for the wild summer lightning strikes of inspiration — it is, paradoxically, necessary to getting any work done. “

 

Happy Independence Day holidays! I’m going to go for some bolts of inspiration. I’m outta here!

 

Summer reading suggestions- books for photographers that aren’t about photography

As the first day of Summer and the longest day of the year approaches, it’s a good time to think about relaxing with a great book. This summer, instead settling into your beach chair with a best-selling mystery or romance novel, pack one of these paperbacks into your beach bag and you’ll have more than a tan when you’re done.

You’ll end up with some perspectives that can put things into a different focus for you regarding where photography is headed– and how you fit in. I think it’s essential for any small business owner to get a macro-economic business perspective. Reading outside your industry niche gives you the business equivalent of a liberal arts education vs. trade school education. Both kinds of education are very valuable. But added together, the whole is greater than the sum of the parts.
In the same way, maintaining a well-rounded and broad business perspective can generate new insights about marketing your photography. In between reading the CS6 manuals, take a look at these.

The first few books will give you a wonderful dose of confidence about being in a creative industry

A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future by Daniel Pink

Linchpin: Are You Indispensable? by marketing guru, Seth Godin

These best-sellers by Malcolm Gladwell really make you think.The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference  and  Outliers: The Story of Success

Here are two of my favorite big-picture guides–one for a perspective on the global economy: The World Is Flat [Updated and Expanded]: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century by Thomas Friedman

 and one to help you manage day-to-day priorities: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Steven Covey

And finally, for a different perspective on what might be really holding you back,have some fun examining your foundational beliefs with this help of this book: Loving What Is: Four Questions That Can Change Your Life by Byron Katie & Stephen Mitchell

Have fun in the summer sun!